End users and IT disagree on definition of good desktop user experience

user experience

An important gap has been identified between what end users and IT professionals respectively perceive to be a good user experience, according to a new survey conducted by Dimensional Research for AppSense.

Key areas of disconnect include issues related to performance, security and productivity, resulting in frustrated users and IT professionals alike.

“Our research shows that IT needs to take a much closer look at what end users want from their desktop experience,” said Jed Ayres, senior vice president of marketing, AppSense.  “IT professionals enforcing corporate security policies and limiting end user choice are preventing end users from working the way they want and slowing productivity.”

More than 86 per cent of end users rated good performance as the top factor in determining a great user experience, and IT professionals rated this only 11 per cent lower in importance. However, while 63 per cent of end users and IT professionals ranked fast logon and logoff times as the third most important factor, they disagreed markedly on the definition of “fast”. More than 63 per cent of end users seek a logon time of 30 seconds or less, whereas more than 42 per cent of IT professionals believe that logon can extend to as long as three minutes.

The survey also pointed to security as being perceived as intrusive and non-productive by end users. More than 63 percent of end users ranked unobtrusive security as important to a great desktop experience, whereas just 46 per cent of IT professionals ranked it as an important factor.

A full 71 per cent of end users believe the quality of their work and their productivity are impacted by their desktop experience. However, only 55 per cent of IT professionals though that providing a great desktop experience significantly impacts business outcomes.

A large frustration for end users is the inability to personalise their desktops. More than half (52 per cent) of end users say personalisation would increase their productivity. However, 95 per cent of IT professionals limit desktop personalisation in some way, with 35 percent stating it is to meet corporate security policies.

AppSense argues that User Environment Management technology would allow IT to close this expectation gap on desktop experience by allowing IT to centralise desktop security, management and personalisation policies, while allowing end users greater personalisation.

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